Peter Asaro

Princeton CITP & The New School

Peter Asaro

Princeton CITP & The New School

Biography

Dr. Peter Asaro is a Visiting Fellow at Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy, Assistant Professor at the School of Media Studies of The New School, and an Affiliate Scholar at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. He is also co-founder and vice-chair of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control, and spokesperson for the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, an international coalition of NGOs.

His current research focuses on the social, cultural, political, legal and ethical dimensions of automation and robotics, from a perspective that combines media theory with science and technology studies. He has written widely-cited papers on lethal robotics from the perspective of just war theory and human rights. Dr. Asaro’s research also examines agency and autonomy, liability and punishment, and privacy and surveillance as it applies to consumer robots, industrial automation, smart buildings, and autonomous vehicles. His research has been published in international peer reviewed journals and edited volumes, and he is currently writing a book that interrogates the intersections between advanced robotics, and social and ethical issues.

Dr. Asaro received his PhD in the History, Philosophy and Sociology of Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he also earned a Master of Arts from theDepartment of Philosophy, and a Master of Computer Science from the Department of Computer Science. He has held research positions at the Center for Cultural Analysis at Rutgers University, the HUMlab of Umeå University in Sweden, and the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna. He has also developed technologies in the areas of virtual reality, data visualization and sonification, human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, artificial intelligence, machine learning, robot vision, and neuromorphic robotics at the National Center for Supercomputer Applications (NCSA), the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, and Iguana Robotics, Inc., and was involved in the design of the natural language interface for theWolfram|Alpha computational knowledge engine for Wolfram Research–this interface is also used by Apple’s Siri and Microsoft’s Bing to answer math queries, and won two 2010 SXSW Web Interactive Awards for Technical Achievement and Best of Show.

He is completing an Oral History of Robotics project that is funded by the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society and the National Endowment for the Humanities Office of Digital Humanities. He has also just initiated a new three-year project on Regulating Autonomous Artificial Agents: A Systematic Approach to Developing AI & Robot Policy, funded by the Future of Life Institute with the support of Elon Musk.

All session by Peter Asaro